The Journal of Web Science

Web Science embraces the study of the Web as a vast information network of people and communities. It also includes the study of people and communities by using the digital records of user activity mediated by the Web. An understanding of human behavior and social interaction can contribute to our understanding of the Web, and data obtained from the Web can contribute to our understanding of human behavior and social interaction. Accordingly, Web Science involves analysis and design of Web architecture and applications, as well as studies of the people, organizations, and policies that shape and are shaped by the Web.

To address these diverse goals, The Journal of Web Science is inherently interdisciplinary, integrating computer and information sciences, communication, linguistics, sociology, psychology, economics, law, political science, and other disciplines.

The Journal of Web Science is unique in the manner in which it brings these disciplines together in creative and critical dialogue. We therefore invite research papers describing original research from all the above disciplines, as well as those that cross traditional disciplinary boundaries.

In order to best serve the community, The Journal of Web Science will provide immediate open access to its content. Accepted papers will be published online immediately upon acceptance. The copyright of the published articles stays with the authors. It is free for authors as well as for readers.


Vol 2, No 1 (2016)

Table of Contents

Articles

Modeling Activation Processes in Human Memory to Predict the Reuse of Tags Published version
Christoph Trattner, Dominik Kowald, Paul Seitlinger, Simone Kopeinik, Tobias Ley
An Extended Investigation of the Similarity Between Privacy Policies of Social Networking Sites as a Precursor for Standardization Preprint
Emma Cradock, David Millard, Sophie Stalla-Bourdillon
Overlap in the Web Search Results of Google and Bing Published version
Rakesh Agrawal, Behzad Golshan, Evangelos Papalexakis
Tracking onscreen gender and role bias over time Preprint
Will Radford, Matthias Gallé